Guitar Pick Thickness: How to Choose the Right One for You

Guitar Pick Thickness

When it comes to choosing the right guitar pick thickness, there are a lot of things to consider. Depending on your playing style, you may need a different thickness than someone else.

In this blog post, we will discuss the different factors that go into choosing the right guitar pick thickness for you! We will also provide a guitar pick thickness chart to help you out.

What Is A Plectrum?

A plectrum is a small, thin piece of material that is used to pluck strings on a guitar. Plectrums come in many different sizes and shapes, but they all serve the same purpose.

Plectra can be made from a variety of materials including:

  • Plastic
  • Celluloid
  • Nylon
  • Metal
  • Stone
  • Glass
  • Wood

Each material has its own unique feel and sound. For example, a plastic pick will have a brighter sound, while a metal pick will have a warmer sound.

Plectra can also come in different shapes including:

  • Teardrop
  • Triangular
  • Square
  • Oval
  • Round

The shape of the pick can also affect the sound. For example, an around pick will have a brighter sound, while a triangular pick will have a darker sound.

Why Use A Guitar Pick?

why use guitar pick

Guitar picks are used to pluck the strings of a guitar. They come in different shapes and sizes, and each one produces a different sound. The thickness of a guitar pick also affects the sound it produces.

Picks come in different thicknesses, measured in millimeters (mm). The most common thicknesses are 0.46 mm, 0.71 mm, and 0.81 mm.

0.46 mm picks are the thinnest picks available. They’re also the most popular pick size because they offer a good balance of control and speed. If you’re a beginner, or if you play lead guitar, this is a good pick size to start with.

0.71 mm picks are thicker than 0.46 mm picks, and they’re good for strumming chords. If you find that you’re having trouble getting a clear sound when you pluck individual strings, try using a thicker pick.

0.81 mm picks are the thickest picks available. They’re good for rhythm guitar, and they’re also the best choice for beginners. If you’re having trouble getting a clear sound when you pluck individual strings, try using a thicker pick.

How to Choose the Right Guitar Pick Thickness?

choose the right guitar pick

There are a few things that you need to take into account when choosing the right guitar pick thickness. The first is the type of music you want to play. If you want to play lead guitar, then you will need a thinner pick so you can easily maneuver around the strings. If you are looking to play rhythm guitar, then a thicker pick is best so you can strum more forcefully.

The second thing to consider is the type of guitar you have. If you have an acoustic guitar, then you will need a thicker pick so you can strum without damaging the strings. If you have an electric guitar, then you can use either a thicker or thinner pick depending on your playing style.

The last thing to consider is your own personal preference. Some guitarists prefer a thinner pick so they can have more control over their playing, while others prefer a thicker pick for the added force it provides. The best way to figure out what thickness you prefer is to experiment with different picks until you find one that feels comfortable for you.

Now that you know the different factors to consider when choosing a guitar pick thickness, let’s take a look at a heavy guitar pick thickness table. This will give you a better idea of what thicknesses are available and what they are best suited for.

Guitar Pick Thickness Chart

Extra heavy: > .090 inches
Heavy: .080 – .090 inches
Medium heavy: .070 – .080 inches
Medium guitar pick thickness: .055 – .070 inches
Light: .045 – 055 inches
Extra light: >.045 inches

As you can see, there is a wide range of guitar pick thicknesses to choose from. The best way to figure out which one is right for you is to experiment with different picks until you find one that feels comfortable for you.

Our Recommendation Best Guitar Picks:

Conclusion

We hope this blog post has helped you understand the different factors to consider when choosing a guitar pick thickness. If you have any questions, feel free to leave a comment below!

Frequently Ask Questions

How thick should a guitar pick be?

The thickness of a guitar pick is measured in millimeters (mm). The most common thicknesses are 0.46 mm, 0.71 mm, and 0.81 mm. However, there is a wide range of thicknesses available, from extra heavy (> .090 inches) to extra light (> .045 inches). The best way to figure out which thickness is right for you is to experiment with different picks until you find one that feels comfortable for you.

Is a thicker guitar pick better?

There is no one-size-fits-all answer to this question. Some guitarists prefer a thicker pick for the added force it provides, while others prefer a thinner pick so they can have more control over their playing. The best way to figure out what thickness you prefer is to experiment with different picks until you find one that feels comfortable for you.

Does the thickness of a guitar pick matter?

The thickness of a guitar pick can affect your playing in a few different ways. For example, a thicker pick will provide more force when strumming, while a thinner pick will be easier to maneuver around the strings. The best way to figure out which thickness is right for you is to experiment with different picks until you find one that feels comfortable for you.

Should I get a thin or medium guitar pick?

There is no one-size-fits-all answer to this question. Some guitarists prefer a thinner pick so they can have more control over their playing, while others prefer a thicker pick for the added force it provides. The best way to figure out what thickness you prefer is to experiment with different picks until you find one that feels comfortable for you.

That’s all for the best guitar pick thickness for beginners guide. You can also check out 15 Best Grateful Dead Live Albums: Rolling Stone’s Picks and How to Draw a Guitar Step by Step Tutorial.

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