A Short Overview of Scale Modes (Simple Guide)

Scale Modes

Have you ever wondered how different scale modes sound? In music, scale mode is a musical scale that has a different order of notes than the major or minor scales. The mode can also refer to the specific sound of a particular scale.

There are many different scale modes, and each one has a unique sound. In this blog post, we’ll take a look at four of the most popular scale modes and listen to examples of each one. By the end, you’ll have a better understanding of how these modes work and what sets them apart from each other.

Major Scale Mode

The major scale is the most commonly used mode in Western music. It has a bright, happy sound that is perfect for upbeat songs. The major scale consists of seven notes, each separated by a whole step (two frets on the guitar). The formula for a major scale is W-W-W-W-W-W-H, where W = whole step and H = half step.

Here’s an example of a C major scale:

C-D-E-F-G-A-B-C

Minor Scale Mode

The minor scale is the second most common mode in Western music. It has a sadder, more introspective sound than the major scale. The minor scale also consists of seven notes, but the intervals between those notes are different. The formula for a minor scale is W-H-W-W-H-W-(H), where W = whole step and H = half step.

Here’s an example of an A minor scale:

A-B-C-D-E-F-G-(A)

Dorian Mode

The Dorian mode is named after the ancient greek Dorian tribe. It’s thought to have originated in ancient Greece or Persia. The Dorian mode has a similar sound to the minor scale, but with a few key differences. Firstly, the Dorian mode uses a natural 6th instead of a flat 6th (also called tempo).

Secondly, it has a raised 9th instead of a flat 9th (which gives it a brighter sound). Lastly, it has a raised 13th instead of a flat 13th (again, making it brighter sounding). The formula for the Dorian mode is W-H-W-(W)-(W)-H-(W), where W = whole step and H = half step.

An example of an E Dorian mode would be: E-(F)-(G)-A-(B)-C-(D)-E This would be played on guitar as follows: low E string open to high E string 2nd fret. So all notes would be two frets above their natural positions except for F & C which would be one fret below their natural positions & B which would be played in natural/open position on guitar)

Lydian Mode

The Lydian mode is named after the ancient Greek Lydians tribe and is thought to have originated in ancient Greece or Persia. Like the Dorian mode, it’s similar to the major scale but with some key differences. Firstly, it uses a sharp 4th instead of a natural 4th (giving it an exotic sounding tone). Secondly, it uses a sharp 11th instead of a natural 11th (this adds dissonance and tension to the sound). Lastly, it omits the 13th altogether (this gives it an unfinished feel).

The formula for Lydian mode is W-(W)-(H)-W-(W)-(H)-(W), where W = whole step and H = half step. Here’s an example: if we were in the key of C Major, then an F Lydian would be F-(G)-(A#/Bb)-C-(D)-(E#/F)-(F#/Gb) This would be played on guitar as follows:(all notes lowered one fret from their natural positions except A# which would stay same as Bb & F# which lowered two frets from their natural positions Gb)

Conclusion:

There you have it! A quick overview of four popular scale modes. Each one has its own distinct sound that can be used to create beautiful music. Experiment with these modes and see how they can change the sound of your favorite songs!

Meanwhile, you can also check out 15 Best Nicki Minaj Songs So Far (Updated List) and 15 Best John Legend Songs to Add to Your Playlist.

Frequently Ask Questions

What are the 7 modes of C major?

The seven modes of C major are Ionian, Dorian, Phrygian, Lydian, Mixolydian, Aeolian, and Locrian. Each mode has a unique sound that can be used to create beautiful music.

What is the difference between major and minor scales?

The major scale has a bright, happy sound that is perfect for upbeat songs. The minor scale has a sadder, more introspective sound. The Dorian mode has a similar sound to the minor scale, but with a few key differences. Firstly, the Dorian mode uses a natural 6th instead of a flat 6th (also called tempo). Secondly, it has a raised 9th instead of a flat 9th (which gives it a brighter sound). Lastly, it has a raised 13th instead of a flat 13th (again, making it brighter sounding).

How do you remember scale modes?

There are a few ways to remember scale modes. One way is to think about the order of the notes in each mode. For example, the Ionian mode (the major scale) starts on the note C and proceeds in this order: C D E F G A B C.

Are there modes for every scale?

Yes, there are modes for every scale. Each scale has seven modes, each with a different starting note.

How do scale modes work?

Scale modes work by starting on a different note in the scale and playing through the rest of the notes in order. For example, if you were to play the C major scale starting on note D, you would be playing the Dorian mode.

That’s all! You can also check out How to Avoid Voice Cracking (An Easy Guide) and What is Jazz and Why Is It Important?.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

  −  1  =  1